Union Station (Northampton, Massachusetts)

Northampton

Amtrak inter-city rail station

The former Union Station building and
the new temporary platform

Location
125A Pleasant Street
Northampton, Massachusetts

Coordinates
42°19′08.3″N 72°37′36.3″W / 42.318972°N 72.626750°W / 42.318972; -72.626750Coordinates: 42°19′08.3″N 72°37′36.3″W / 42.318972°N 72.626750°W / 42.318972; -72.626750

Line(s)
Conn River Line

Platforms
1 side platform

Tracks
1

Construction

Parking
Yes

Bicycle facilities
No

Disabled access
Yes

Other information

Station code
Amtrak code: NHT

History

Opened
1897 (original station)
December 29, 2014 (new platform)

Traffic

Passengers (FY2015 partial year)
11,923[1] (Amtrak)

Services

Preceding station
 
Amtrak
 
Following station

Holyoke
toward Washington, DC

Vermonter

Greenfield
toward St. Albans

Union Station is a historic passenger rail station located along the Connecticut River Line in Northampton, Massachusetts.
The historic building, which today is no longer used as a train station, has been converted into a 200-seat banquet facility, a sports bar, and facility known as the Tunnel Bar that runs underneath the building.[2]
Built at the close of the nineteenth century, the structure incorporates many feature of the Richardsonian Romanesque architectural style. The buff brick masses of the station are trimmed with red Longmeadow brownstone and hooded by red tile roofs. Steep dormers protrude from the roofline. The interior once featured Italian marble floors, oak woodwork, and a large fireplace.[3]
On December 29, 2014, Amtrak’s Vermonter began stopping at a new passenger rail boarding platform located just to the south of the historic Union Station building.[4]

Railway history[edit]
Former service[edit]

The former Connecticut River Railroad depot, ca. 1880s

The former New Haven and Northampton Railroad depot, ca. 1880s

Union Station, ca. 1900

The Connecticut River Railroad opened to passenger service between Springfield and Northampton in late 1845; trains reached Deerfield in August 1846, Greenfield in December 1847, and the junction with the Central Vermont Railway in January 1849. When the Vermont and Massachusetts Railroad reached Brattleboro in 1850, the Connecticut River Railroad began running through service from Springfield to Brattleboro.[5] Over the next century, the line was host to a mix of local and long-distance passenger and fre